fbpx

Slice like the Pros

Share this article:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on pinterest

Perhaps the most basic kitchen utensil – certainly one of the most essential – knives have had a special place in food preparation for centuries. Like any tool, knives come in many variations, each geared towards a specific task; from slicing fruit and vegetables, to carving up meat, to serving cakes. There’s always a knife out there that’s just right for the job. In this article, we’re going to cover 6 of the most common types of knives used in the kitchen and look at what tasks they’re suited for.

 

Chef’s Knife

The Swiss army knife of any collection, the chef’s knife is a classic; suitable for chopping, dicing, slicing and carving. Measuring between 6-12 inches from tip to pommel, chef’s knives feature a gradually curved blade. This curve allows for the user to easily rock the cutting edge back and forth, producing a fine mince.

 

Clever

Heavy, with a wide blade and an almost straight edge, cleavers excel at chopping. Relying on their weight more than a razor sharp edge, cleavers are used to section off cuts of meat and are able to cut through thin bones, sinew and cartilage. They are also useful when preparing hard vegetables like pumpkin, where a thinner blade may struggle to cut through. The side of the blade is also suited to crushing small food items, such as cloves of garlic.

 

The Bread Knife

With its saw-like blade, the bread knife is easily distinguished from other kitchen knives. The serrated blade also hints at how to put it to proper use. Where an ordinary blade would require great pressure to slice through a loaf of bread, the bread knife’s sawing movement allows for easy cutting while preventing crushing. Beyond bread, this knife is also handy when it comes to cutting through fruits with a tough outer rind such as passion fruit or watermelon. The major drawback of a serrated blade is that it is difficult to sharpen, but it is possible!

 

The Fillet Knife

The surgical scalpel of the kitchen, the fillet knife is long and thin, tapering to a point. Razor sharp and easily manoeuvrable, this knife is ideal for separating bone from meat. In the case of fish, the fillet knife can also separate skin from meat. Because of its flexible blade, the fillet knife isn’t the best tool for slicing up your fish, but it is still the best tool for the meat prep.

 

The Slicing Knife

If you often prepare large cuts of meat, the slicing knife is for you. With a long, straight blade, you can easily slice precise cuts of meat without having to saw your way through the cut. Whether it’s a roast chicken, a slab of pork belly or lamb, delight your diners with neat slices.

 

The Paring Knife

Where the chef’s knife is the workhorse of your knife arsenal, the paring knife is its smaller and more precise cousin. Perfectly suited for the jobs that would be too clumsy with the chef’s knife, the paring knife is small enough to suit a wide variety of grips, meaning you can cut on a board or above it. Pull it out when the job at hand requires a more delicate touch such as peeling, deseeding, coring and more.

There are many more knives, each with a unique task it is suited for, but with these 6 blades you should be well equipped for any job that comes your way. Ready to start cutting it up?

Share this article:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on pinterest

RELATED ARTICLES

RELATED ARTICLES

RECENT POSTS

The Best Oil for Cooking, and the Worst

Each variety of oil has its own flavours and properties and can add to a dish in its own special way. Sounds great, right? Perhaps not. If you lack a little confidence in the kitchen or are new to this cooking caper, the world of oil can seem like a confusing slippery slope. This simple list will help you find your feet, but first a little oil 101. Oil is a fat, like butter, but fat is good: it protects …

Seven Edible Gift Ideas for Father’s Day

Father’s Day is just around the corner! If you haven’t already settled on a gift for your dad, here are some delicious culinary ideas that will hit the mark. For the grilling dad: BBQ Sauce Your dad is the king of the grill, but if he’s a meat-focused guy who always uses store-bought sauce, he’ll go crazy for a jar of authentic, homemade BBQ sauce for his ribs, chicken and roasts. Something to bear in mind though: there are several …

Make Your Own Kimchi? Yes You Can!

Love Wholesome contributor Jo-ann Huang tries her hand at making the national side dish of Korea. With a complex blend of spice, tang and sweetness, and an unforgettable bright red hue, kimchi has become Korea’s biggest cultural export along with K-pop. And while many people around the world have probably only discovered kimchi in recent decades, its origins date back more than 2,000 years to the Three Kingdoms era. Every Korean family has its own kimchi recipe, refined through several …

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on google
Share on pinterest