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EarthFest Singapore 2018: Sustainability On Display

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Now in its third year, EarthFest Singapore once again lived up to its billing as the Republic’s largest sustainability festival by welcoming nearly 7,000 visitors on January 14.

Organiser Michael Broadhead says the festival truly “walks the walk” by adopting sustainable practices. All crafts, setup and décor were environmentally friendly and designed for zero waste. The disposable plates and utensils used at the event, for example, were cut up and converted into compost for a local organic vegetable farm, while all food served was made from environmentally sustainable produce.

The wide variety of cuisines available at EarthFest – including Mediterranean, Western and Asian – demonstrated how a healthy, eco-conscious diet doesn’t have to compromise on flavour. Ideas on how to source fresh ingredients for home cooking were also featured – everything from DIY urban farming kits to local, organically grown produce. Farm-to-table providers showcased their vegetable subscription boxes, a service that delivers a mix of organic-certified veggies right to your doorstep each week.

Here are some video highlights of the day.

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