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Burrata and Anchovy Pizza

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This classic Burrata and Anchovy Pizza carries a hearty portion of anchovies and creamy burrata, with a hint of spice to excite the palate. Making pizza in your kitchen is easy with a food processor to help you knead the dough.

Preparation time:  35 minutes | Cooking time: 25 minutes | Serves: Up to 4

INGREDIENTS

For the dough

  • 500g ‘00’ flour
  • 1 tps salt
  • 7g (1 sachet) instant dried yeast
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 4 tbsp olive oil

For the topping

  • 250g mozzarella, drained
  • 200g burrata, drained
  • 50g parmesan
  • 16 anchovy fillets
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • ½ small bunch parsley, leaves picked and roughly chopped
  • 1 red chilli, sliced
  • Salt and pepper

METHOD

1. Measure 320ml warm water into a jug, and add the yeast, sugar and olive oil. Leave to sit for 15 minutes, until foamy.

2. Add the flour and salt to the bowl of your Multipro Sense Food Processor, fitted with the dough blade, and turn on to speed 3. Slowly pour the yeast mixture down the feed tube, then allow the blade to mix and knead the dough for 7 minutes, until it is a smooth ball.

3. Remove the dough from the processor, and place in an oiled bowl, covered with a damp tea towel. Reserve in a warm place for 1 hour, until the dough has doubled in size.

4. Preheat the oven to 275C, and place a large baking tray inside to heat up.

5. Using your hands, knock the air out of the dough, and divide into 4.

6. Roll each piece of dough out onto a floured sheet of parchment. Tear up the mozzarella and divide between the pizzas. Halve each anchovy fillet and top the pizzas. Drizzle each with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper.

7. Remove the baking tray from the oven, and carefully slide one pizza, on it’s parchment, onto the hot baking tray. Return to the oven for 5-7 minutes, until the cheese is melted and the base is coloured and crisp. Repeat with the other 3 pizzas.

8. When the pizzas come out of the oven, finely grate parmesan over them, then tear up the burrata and distribute over each pizza. Scatter with chopped parsley and sliced chillis.

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