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Five Spice Meat Roll (Ngoh Hiang)

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Wu Xiang, also known as “Ngoh Hiang” or “Lor Bak” is a common Hokkien and Teochew dish widely adopted in many regions of Malaysia and Singapore. It is essentially a composition of various meats and vegetables and other ingredients, seasoned with five-spice powder (Hokkien:五香粉, ngó͘-hiong-hún) after which it is named, rolled inside a thin beancurd sheet and deep-fried to golden brown.

This recipe makes 20 mini sized Wu Xiang meat rolls.

INGREDIENTS

200 gram jicama
200 gram taro
200 gram chicken breast meat
30 gram red onion, sliced
50 gram soaked tofu skin
1 medium sized egg
1 tsp five spice powder
1 tsp white pepper powder
1 tsp salt
20 sheets beancurd skin

METHOD

1. In a KENWOOD food processor, process jicama to pulp.

2. Transfer the pulp to a strainer fit into a bowl, press to release its juice.

3. Process taro until pulp, add in chicken meat and jicama pulp.

4. Add in egg, five spice powder, salt and white pepper powder.

5. Transfer the mixture into a bowl, mix in onion slices and soaked tofu skin.

6. Fill 30 gram of fillings onto a beancurd sheet. Repeat the above steps until all fillings have been used up.

7. Fry in hot oil until golden brown.

8. Serve warm.

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