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Hokkien Ngoh Hiang

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Crispy on the outside, soft on the inside! This unique Hokkien and Teochew dish is filled with all the goodness in each roll, and it will never be enough for everybody! Here’s bringing to you Hokkien Ngoh Hiang and this recipe is brought to you by ShareFood.sg contributor Irene Tan, where she shares her Ah Ma’s recipe. When a recipe is passed down from generations to generations, that’s when you know it’s good! Full post here.

INGREDIENTS

  • 300 g boneless chicken thigh cut into smaller pieces
  • 300 g prawn meat cut roughly
  • 180 g water chestnut skinned and submerge in water till it’s ready to be used
  • 1 small carrot skinned
  • 1 stalk spring onion chopped
  • 1.5 tsp salt
  • 25 g garlic minced
  • 2 tbsp tapioca flour
  • 4 tbsp rice flour
  • 1/2 tsp five spice powder
  • 1/2 tbsp fried sole fish blend into powder
  •  a dash of pepper
  • 1 packet less salty bean curd sheet
  • 1 egg beaten and split into 2 bowls. ½ egg for binding the meat, ½ egg for sealing the edges of the beancurd skin
Toppings
  •  sweet sauce and chilli dipping sauce
  •  lettuce garnish

METHOD

Prepare the meat filling

In a Kenwood Multipro Compact food processor, attached the dough blade.
Pour in chicken meat and prawn. Blend for 30 sec to mix the ingredients. #Tips: Do not over blend the ingredients so that you can enjoy the meat texture when eaten.
Remove the lid, add in ½ egg, garlic, salt, fish powder, five spice powder, tapioca flour, rice flour and spring onion. Close the lid and blend for another 30 sec.
Remove the blade from the food processor. Attached the shredding disc with the largest hole, shred carrot and water chestnut into the mixture. Remove the disc, use a spatula to give it a good mix. Set aside.

Wrap

Cut beancurd sheet into smaller pcs about 8” x 5” rectangle.
Clean the sheets with a damp cloth to remove the excess salt.
Scoop 3 tbsp of the filling and line on beancurd sheet, leaving a 1-inch space on both ends of the beancurd sheet. Apply egg wash, roll up and ensure all sides are sealed. #Tips: Do not wrap it too tightly as the meat may expand while cooking and the beancurd skin will tear apart.

Cook

Arrange the Ngoh hiang in a heatproof plate and steam for 10 mins and let cool for about 20 mins.
Heat up the oil in the wok. Deep fry till golden brown. Drain the oil and lay it on a paper towel.
Once cool, cut n serve on plate. Garnish and serve together with dipping sauce.

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