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Japanese Custard Puff

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These Japanese Custard Puffs  (also known as Shu Cream) are baked choux pastry with a sweet, crackly, crunchy cookies topping and filled with custard and whipped cream in the center.

This recipe makes 24 pieces puffs.

INGREDIENTS

TO MAKE CRAQUELIN TOPPING

45 gram unsalted butter
50 gram sugar
45 gram plain flour

 

METHOD

1. Mix together butter and sugar.
2. Fold in plain flour.
3. Transfer the dough onto a clean plastic sheet.
4. Roll the dough into a log and keep in freezer to set.

 

TO MAKE CHOUX PASTRY

113 gram water
55 gram salted butter
75 gram plain flour
2 “A” sized eggs
1 tbsp sugar

 

METHOD

1. Boil water and salted butter until melted.
2. Add in flour and sugar. Stir vigorously until dough is formed.
3. Transfer the dough into a Kenwood Kflex mixing bowl attached with a creaming beater. Gradually mix in eggs, one at a time until combined.
4. Cream for another 5 minutes until smooth, transfer the mixture into a pipping bag fitted with a small round nozzle.
5. Pipe on a silicon mat and top with sliced craquelin dough (3 gram) each.
6. Bake in preheated oven of 180 degrees Celsius until cooked.
7. Cut half and fill in with custard cream (recipe follows).

 

TO MAKE COCONUT CUSTARD CREAM

13 gram custard powder
25 gram caster sugar
125 gram light coconut milk
50 gram cream

 

METHOD

1. Dissolve custard powder, caster sugar into light coconut milk.
2. Stir until thicken, allow to cool. Beat in cream, and transfer into piping bag.

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