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Lentil Vadai

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These are tasty little morsels that are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They are made with lentils and bound with mashed chickpeas. Although they great straight out of the frying pan, they are just as delicious at room temperature.

Makes approximately 15 pcs.

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS:

350 gram dhal, preferably Australian

150 gram chickpeas, mashed

4 dried chillies

4 bird’s eye chillies, chopped

10 gram fennel seeds

5 gram poppy seeds

6 gram bicarbonate of soda

30 gram trans fat free shortening

50 gram ginger, chopped

60 gram red onions, chopped

2 sprigs curry leaves, finely sliced

20 gram coriander, finely sliced

salt to taste

palm oil, for deep-frying

METHOD

METHOD

1. Soak dhal and dried chilli for 6 hours.

2. Blend roughly with mashed chik peas, bird’s eye chillies, fennel seeds, poppy seeds and a little water.

3. Add bicarbonate of soda, margarine, chopped ginger, onions, curry leaves and coriander.

4. Season to taste with salt.

5. Coat the palms of your hands with a little oil and form 120 gram little patties from the blended mixture.

6. Heat oil in a large frying pot until it reaches 140°C.

7. Deep fry the patties until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Drain on greaseproof paper to allow excess oil to run before serving.

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