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Steamed Pak Sou Kong with Katuk Leaves

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Literally translated to the ‘white whiskered grandpa’ catfish. The silver catfish is often regarded as the crème of crop by most foodies from Central Malaysia, the flesh is silky, creamy and does not carry muddy taste due to its preferred habitat of running stream. This fish is steamed together with “katuk” leaves or sauropus in English. The fish’s silky smooth and neutral flesh truly marries well with the vegetable.

This recipe uses the Cooking Chef.

Ingredients

6 tbsp premium soy sauce

1 tbsp organic sugar

8 tbsp water

2 tbsp Bentong ginger, juiced

50 g coriander root, cleaned

1 “Pak Sou Kong”, weighing about 800 g – 1 kg, gutted and cleaned

250 g katuk leaves

20g premium gouji berries

Garnish

fried leek

fried ginger

Method

1. Cook together soy sauce, sugar, water, ginger juice and coriander root in a saucepan.

2. Place fish on a plate lined with katuk leaves and gouji beriies. Pour the sauce over fish and steam in Cooking Chef for 12 minutes or until cooked.

3. Garnish with fried leek and ginger.

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