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Tomato and Feta Tartlets

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For a picnic under the sun or a bite-sized party snack, these Tomato and Feta Tartlets are the perfect treat to whip up. A yummy and easy-to-make healthy bite, these sumptuous treats are almost effortless.

INGREDIENTS

  • 170g plain flour
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 100g butter, cubed
  • 1 egg yolk
  • For the filling
  • 200g Feta
  • 120g full fat cream cheese
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 bunch coriander, leaves picked
  • 500g heirloom tomatoes, sliced
  • 4 tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 2 tbsp black toasted sesame seeds

METHOD

1. Using your Multipro Sense Food Processor, fitted with the knife blade, pulse together the flour, salt and butter for the pastry, until the butter is distributed and the texture is that of soft breadcrumbs. With the machine running, add the egg yolk and 2 tbsp ice cold water, and pulse until the pastry comes together in a craggy ball. Tip out the pastry, knead briefly, and wrap in clingfilm. Place into the fridge to chill for 30 minutes

2. Preheat your oven to 200C.

3. To the clean bowl of your food processor, fitted with the knife blade, add the Feta, cream cheese, salt, pepper, and coriander, reserving a small handful of leaves for garnishing. Pulse everything together until you have a smooth creamy spread, speckled with green. Reserve.

4. Divide the pastry into 8 small balls, and roll each one out into a circle around 2-3mm thick. Line 8 tartlet tins with the pastry, then place all of the tartlet shells into the freezer for 15 minutes.

5. Bake the frozen pastry shells in the preheated oven for 15 minutes, until they are golden and crisp. Remove from the oven and cool.

6. Divide the creamy filling between the pastry cases, and arrange the tomatoes over the filling. Remove the filled tarts from their tins. Drizzle the tartlets with sesame oil, sprinkle with black sesame seeds, and scatter over the reserved coriander leaves, to garnish. Serve immediately.

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