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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year

Lucky CNY Dishes and Their Symbolism

Non-native Chinese speakers who try to pick up the language are often amused to discover that different words can possess the same pronunciations while taking on entirely different meanings and characteristics. For instance, the word “no”, pronounced as 不(bù), shares the same pronunciation as 布, which is Chinese for cloth. Being a superstitious bunch, the Chinese have used this similarity in pronunciation to associate luck, prosperity, and good health with a list of foods and dishes typically eaten during Chinese …

Celebrating the Year of the Rat the Vegan Way

Millions of people of Chinese descent unite with their friends and family every Lunar New Year to wish each other prosperity and good health. Yet, we pig out, feasting on Chinese delicacies chock full of fat, sugar and rich cuts of meat. We reason that it’s a once-a-year occasion, and we will take our new year resolution of eating clean and exercising regularly seriously this time around. Obviously, good health isn’t something that happens because your superstitious grand-aunt wished for …

A Comprehensive Guide to Yu Sheng

Writer Jo-ann Huang investigates a Lunar New Year tradition specific to Southeast Asia that has confounded her for over a decade At Chinese New Year, few dishes are as divisive as Yu Sheng. Do you revel in the ritual, tossing veggies as high as you can? Or do you have to be dragged kicking and screaming by your elders, rolling your eyes at how silly and superstitious it seems? Perhaps it’s less the ritual than the actual dish itself. While …

Kueh Belanda or Peranakan Love Letters

Legend has it that these sweet confections were used to hide messages exchanged by secret lovers. There is no secret to making them, though, but you will need an electrical mould or Love Letter Plates from your local bakery supplier.

Hokkien Ngoh Hiang

Crispy on the outside, soft on the inside! This unique Hokkien and Teochew dish is filled with all the goodness in each roll, and it will never be enough for everybody! Here’s bringing to you Hokkien Ngoh Hiang and this recipe is brought to you by ShareFood.sg contributor Irene Tan, where she shares her Ah Ma’s recipe. When a recipe is passed down from generations to generations, that’s when you know it’s good! Full post here.

Sweet and Sour Sea Cucumber with Fish Maw

Every dish that is served during Chinese New Year has an auspicious meaning behind it! Our friends at ShareFood.sg bring you this recipe prepared by Jessie Koey, who is a stay home mum and a recipe blogger. In her home town back in Malaysia, this is a family classic dish – Sweet and Sour Sea Cucumber with Fish Maw. The recipe is below, and you can read their full post here.